There are only 2 criteria by which people assess you at the meeting

Surrounding form opinions about us within seconds. But what do they pay attention? Professor at Harvard business school, Amy Cuddy, and the psychologists Susan Fiske and Peter Glick has studied the principles by which it creates the first impression for over 15 years and found certain patterns.
People seeing us for the first time, automatically answer two questions:

  1. “Can I trust this person?”
  2. “Can I respect this person?”

Curiously, most people, especially in professional circles, I believe competence is more important. This is logical, because first of all wants to show that he’s smart enough and talented to do the job.
But in reality, reliability and empathy are essential qualities which other people evaluate us.
“From an evolutionary point of view,” noted Cuddy, for our survival much more important to know if that gets people around us confidence.” And it’s really unfounded, because for the caveman to determine whether his new buddy to kill him and steal all his belongings, was more important than to understand how smart the enough to kindle a fire.

However, the Professor completely denies the importance of existing skills and experience of the person. Cuddy notes that they are evaluated only once with a trust. One-sided demonstration of intelligence and power can lead to quite undesirable results.

If someone, who you trying to impress, doesn’t trust you — you will not move away. Only by creating the image of a reliable, good-hearted person, causing a slight feeling of admiration and trust, you can count on your professional and any other quality will be appreciated.